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The Painful Truth About Psoriasis--Dietary Considerations

Just as with many other chronic health conditions, diet plays a role in disease management.  Here is a quick overview of dietary considerations for people with psoriasis:

First off, if you are a psoriasis patient you may notice that some foods tend to trigger flare-ups more than other foods.  To this point, it's good to be observant and do what your body tells you to do. As long as you follow a healthy diet, this is good!

It has been suggested that people with celiac disease may be at higher risk for psoriasis than other persons. A gluten free-diet is the mainstay of treatment for celiac disease,and it may help keep psoriasis flares at bay as well. But the relationship between gluten intolerance, yeast exposure and psoriasis is not well understood at this point in time. You can try eliminating gluten or yeast if you suspect it to be a problem and see what happens.

Fatty red meats are known to increase heart health risks...and people with psoriasis have an increased risk of heart disease, so eating less of this is beneficial to psoriasis patients.  In addition, fatty foods are associated with increased risk for inflammation. Reducing intake of these foods, helps to keep psoriasis in check!

Dairy foods that are high in fat are another potential issue, because a high fat diet is linked to inflammation. Inflammation is a feature of psoriasis, so the connection is a logical one. Opting for lower fat options of cheeses and milk may help solve the problem.

Foods that are rich in antioxidants, including whole grains, nuts and vegetables are beneficial to psoriasis patients.  These foods may not help psoriatic conditions per se, but they may reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Keep in mind that people with psoriasis have an increased risk of developing these health conditions! Essential fatty acids (omega -3 oils) also help to combat inflammation. Good sources of this nutrient include fish, eggs, and nuts. Here again, this nutrient helps to decrease the risk of heart disease. 

Some patients report that excess alcohol intake causes psoriasis to flare.  Alcohol is one of those things that's best done in moderation anyway, so consider yourself advised. Excessive alcohol intake promotes inflammation and can cause dehydration which may affect the general condition of the skin, especially psoriatic areas.

Vitamins A and D in sufficient amounts are essential for keeping skin healthy.  Vitamin D supplements are available, but the most natural way to obtain it is by spending ten or fifteen minutes in the sun each day. Foods that are good sources of vitamin A include carrots, cantaloupe, mangoes, tomatoes, and watermelon.

Sources:; MaxPixel


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