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Showing posts from May, 2017

Positive Habits For Chronic Pain Patients

Living in chronic pain is a big challenge. And on a daily basis, everything we do contributes to the quality of our lives...or takes away from it.  Therefore, developing positive habits, even in the little things, can make our lives better in small ways and in large ways!



Here's a short list to help get you started:

1) Don't give up the ship!  Any new treatment, diet, or lifestyle change that you try will take time to work.  You might not see the fruits of your efforts right away.  A little patience will go a long way; you might actually miss out on the benefits if you give up too soon!

2) Hope for the best; expect the worst.  Try not to be too negative, but don't let yourself believe that nothing is going to work.  The right solution to your problem is out there somewhere!

3) Remember: Take care of yourself first !  This is true for chronic disease~or not.  You're not being selfish in doing this; as a matter of fact you can't really take care of kids, spouses, p…

Is There A Link To Migraine Headache In YOUR Mouth?

A recent study by the American Gut Project has uncovered that a new link to migraine headache may lie in the amount of nitrates, nitrite, and nitric oxide in the mouth/GI tract of an individual.  In their publication, entitled "Migraines Are Correlated with Higher Levels of Nitrate-,Nitrite, and Nitric-Oxide-Reducing Oral Microbes in the American Gut Project Cohort", study authors report that the amounts of these substances may be linked to the microbes in the mouth and gut.  Higher levels of nitrates seem to be present in migraine sufferers than non-sufferers. It has been known for a long time that nitrates are common headache triggers. For example, headaches can be a side effect of nitroglycerin, a pharmaceutical commonly used to treat angina.




For this project researchers collected over 2,000 oral and fecal samples from people with and without migraine issues. They discovered lower levels of nitrates, nitrite, and nitric oxide reductase genes in the samples from persons w…

Common Comorbid Conditions in Patients With Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is such a mysterious condition--poorly understood, extremely challenging for those diagnosed.  The search for new and better ways to diagnose, treat, and improve quality of life for those afflicted is a work in progress.





Today's post brings you some findings by a private practice physician who has discovered two measurable conditions that exist in fibromyalgia patients. He studied 60 fibromyalgia patients and 12 control patients and found two abnormal lab findings that existed exclusively in the fibromyalgia group.   One finding was a low level of magnesium within the red blood cell. The other finding was a significantly lower level of insulin like growth factor (IGF-1), which is used to determine whether or not a person is producing sufficient amounts of human growth hormone. These conditions are treatable: RBC Magnesium can be treated with a supplement, and IGF-1 issues can be resolved with the help of an endocrinologist.


This is important for two reasons:

1) Sinc…

Variations On A Theme: Evidence Of Multiple Types Of Fibromyalgia

Evidence for the existence of fibromyalgia is clear; studies indicate that dysfunction of the central nervous system occurs.  Additionally, the role of the  peripheral nervous system in fibromyalgia is also problematic.  It is now also apparent that fibromyalgia is really not one disorder, but is instead a group of pain disorders that have some common traits.

As new information continues about this disorder, we can learn to use existing drugs and other treatments for this group of disorders in new and better ways.  And new and better treatments will probably emerge as well!

You can read more about this topic by clicking here.

Sources: Flickr; Americahealthfeed.info


New Study Suggests That IBD Can Progress To Liver Disease

Persons who have had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for a prolonged period of time may be at higher risk for liver disease, according to a recent study at Houston Methodist Hospital. The study of 400 patients was retrospective (looking at data from a past period of time), and consisted of 3 categories:

Patients with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease)
Patients with NAFLD (non alcoholic fatty liver disease)
Patients with concurrent IBD and NAFLD

The findings revealed that persons with both disorders tended to be older.  About 13% of the study group had both conditions, and it appears that long term IBD was a trigger for liver disease. NAFLD can have serious consequences, including cirrhosis, fibrosis and ultimately liver failure.  A broader patient study group is needed to confirm the findings, and determine the link between the two conditions.

You can read more about this recent study by clicking here.